Tag Archives: Ichetucknee Springs State Park

Ichetucknee River – November 16, 2016

Another great day paddling at Ichetucknee Springs State Park.  It was chilly when we headed out for Ft. White but we were stashing our fleece in the cars by the time we arrived at the park.  Since we went in two vehicles with 2 kayaks in each we took advantage of the outfitter’s $5 shuttle offer.  After unloading the boats at the north entrance launch the drivers drove both cars down to the south take out and the outfitter shuttled the two of us back up.  We were thus able to paddle back to our vehicles and head directly from the take out to a local diner for  late lunch.

It was a beautiful, crisp blue sky day.   A perfect day for manatees if the water level had not been so low.  Due to some shoals on the Santa Fe River, the water has to be a bit higher for the manatee to get into the Ichetucknee.  We’ve taken so many pictures of the Ichetucknee that today we thought we would concentrate on some of the little things, like the flowers and insects we see.

The Bur Marigold (Bidens spp) was blooming bright gold and and the Late Purple Aster ((Symphyotrichum patens patens) bushes were humming with bees.

Bur Marigold (Bidens spp)

Bur Marigold (Bidens spp)

Late Purple Aster bush

Late Purple Aster bush with a few Bur Marigold

Late Purple Aster buds

Late Purple Aster buds

Honey bee on Late Purple Aster

Honey bee on Late Purple Aster

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Further downstream we ran across a large patch of Water Hemlock (Cicuta maculata) that the Great Golden Digger Wasps were enjoying.  Water Hemlock occurs throughout Florida and is one of the most poisonous plants on the plant.  The roots, stems, leaves and blooms are all deadly to humans and other mammals.  There is even one report of people dying after eating birds who had ingested the berries.  If you see a patch of white flowers that looks like Queen Anne’s lace growing in the water it’s probably Water Hemlock. The Great Golden Digger Wasps  (Sphex ichneumoneus) is named for the gold hairs on their heads and have orange legs with an orange and black body.  Digger wasps are solitary wasps meaning they don’t build a nest of wood fiber or mud in a colony like social wasps and hornets.  Each female works hard all by herself to build a nest and provide a home and food for her eggs.  She digs a small hole in the ground and deposits her eggs on dead crickets and grasshoppers, then leaves the eggs alone to hatch and grow into adults the next year.   Digger wasps are very important pollinators for gardens and agriculture and in spite of their large size (over an inch long) are not aggressive.  Stings are very rare unless you try to grab one.  So, for both the Water Hemlock and the Great Golden Digger Wasp, look but don’t touch.

Several Great Golden Digger Wasp on Water Hemlock

Several Great Golden Digger Wasp on Water Hemlock

Great Golden Digger Wasp on a Water Hemlock head

Great Golden Digger Wasp on a Water Hemlock head

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Great Golden Digger Wasp on a Water Hemlock

Great Golden Digger Wasp on a Water Hemlock

Closeup of Water Hemlock blossoms

Closeup of Water Hemlock blossoms

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Of course we also saw the usual turtles, mostly Suwannee Cooters on logs and we always see a couple of Great Egrets (Ardea alba) along the way.

Great Egret hunting

Great Egret hunting

Blue sky and blue water on the middle Ichetucknee

Blue sky and blue water on the middle Ichetucknee

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

And we got to see a bit of fall color.  The cypress are looking rusty, the oaks going yellow to brown, the sweet gums and maples in various shades of orange.  It’s so dry this year it is not a great fall for color, but there’s a bit of it around.

Fall colors at Devils Eye Spring

Fall colors at Devils Eye Spring

Fall colors at the south take out

Fall colors at the south take out

Ichetucknee River – May 9, 2015

Back-to-back paddles this weekend.  Saturday was our monthly weekend paddle for the Florida Trail Association on the Ichetucknee.  This is our last trip on the Ich until September since it will be opened to tubers next weekend.  We put in at the north entrance and took out at the “Last Take-out”.  Only about 3.5 miles, but absolutely stunning scenery.

We had a very nice group, both new people and some of my regulars, even one person brand new to kayaking and a Chihuahua named Jesse James. (Only later did we find out that dogs are prohibitted at ISSP.)  We saw a few Swamp lilies, Great Egret, Great Blue Heron, one lone Cormorant, many Cooters and Sliders sunning on logs, and Water Hemlock was everywhere.

Group shot on the upper river

Group shot on the upper river

Devils Eye Spring

Devils Eye Spring

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jesse James on his kayak.

Jesse James rides again (on his kayak)

Jesse James, taking it easy

Jesse James, taking it easy

 

 

 

 

 

 

Water Hemlock

Water Hemlock

Alligator Lily

Alligator Lily

 

 

 

 

 

 

Great Egret

Great Egret

Double-crested Cormorant

Double-crested Cormorant

 

 

Ichetucknee River – April 11, 2015

A very enjoyable little paddle today on the Ichetucknee (Itch-a-TUCK-nee).  Probably the best 3.2 miles of paddling in the state – the only thing wrong with it is that it’s just too darn short.  You can continue on down the river below the state park (and sometimes we do), but it’s another 7 miles before you reach a public boat ramp.  Note that between Memorial Day weekend and Labor Day weekend the whole river within the state park is open for tubing and they run a shuttle bus for the tubers.  We do not recommend boating on the Ich during this period since the river can be filled wall-to-wall with inner tubes.

It was too shady today along the river for the spring wildflowers that are popping up everywhere in the sun, but we saw a few birds, aquatic plants and lots of turtles. Mostly we just coasted and enjoyed being out on the water together again.

Only one 'under" or "around" on the Ich right now

Only one ‘under” or “around” on the Ich right now

Coasting down the Ich under the Spanish Moss

Coasting down the Ich under the Spanish Moss

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Checking out Devils Eye Spring - usually turtles, gar and occasionally a gator

Checking out Devils Eye Spring – usually turtles, gar and occasionally a gator

Strap-leaf Sagittaria (Sagittaria kurziana)

Strap-leaf Sagittaria (Sagittaria kurziana) The flower floats on top of the water, the rest of the plant is underneath

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A turtle convention. You see loads of Cooters (Pseudemys spp) along the Ich. The water is cold - around 72 degrees - so the turtles need to get out onto the logs to warm up

A turtle convention. You see loads of Cooters along the Ich. The water is cold – 72 degrees – so the turtles need to get onto the logs to warm up

A "cover" of American Coots (Fulica americana)

A “cover” of American Coots (Fulica americana)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Unidentified insect - on top of the floating plants. There were so many the plants seemed to be moving and you could actually hear them hopping around.

Unidentified insect – on top of the floating plants. There were so many the plants seemed to be moving and you could actually hear them hopping around.

Close up of Virginia-willow (Itea virginica) also called Sweetspire

Close up of Virginia-willow (Itea virginica) also called Sweetspire